Why should you use CocoaPods?

This blog post has the intention to show to beginners the tool called CocoaPods, if you’re already familiar with it you may find it boring because I’ll probably show you something you already now.

What’s CocoaPods?

“CocoaPods is a dependency manager for Swift and Objective-C Cocoa projects. It has over 37 thousand libraries and is used over 2.6 million apps. CocoaPods can help you scale your projects elegantly.”(CocoaPods)

If you’re familiar with Rails, you may remember the Gemfile system, and yes, it works just like that. In fact CocoaPods is a gem for Ruby. You can contribute for the project by sending a pull request on the official repository.

 

The advantages of using CocoaPods

You are ready to develop your first iOS project, you’re full of ideias, at first having a dependency manager seems to be pretty not necessary, but remember, you app won’t be the same after every update, in fact, if you’re planning to build the next successful app, you may need starting worrying about how to organize it, this where CocoaPods comes in.

Managing a project dependencies by hand it is not the best ideia, actually, it is a terrible idea, imagine having a project with 50 dependencies and having to update all of them ? Scary huh ? That’s the reason you need a project manager, with CocoaPods if you want to update a pod(That’s how a dependency is called in CocoaPods, like a gem in Ruby) you just need to type:

pod update the_name_of_the_pod

and it will do all the work for you, after that you just need to recompile your project on XCode, and that’s all.

Another reason to use CocoaPods is: a lot of big companies are using it, like Facebook , Google and many others.

You have a lot of support, there are thousands of apps using it, and Stackoverflow if full of questions about it.

Acknowledgment

Thanks for reading this post, it is always a pleasure writing for you guys. If you like what you just read and somehow you want to support me, you can become a Patreon . Being my Patreon makes you get my private posts about programming with iOS and Ruby.

If you’d like to know more about me or what I do, you can follow me on Instagram or Twitter .

See you next time!

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Why did I choose Ruby as my first programming language ?

Introduction

Back in the time when I was starting learning how to program, I remember a bunch of guys talking about Java and many other cool stuff and I was really excited about it, but there was also a guy, a shy one, which said me he was learning a different programming language, the one you won’t get scared at first glance, the one with an easy syntax and also a a cool framework called Rails. The programming language he was talking about was Ruby.

At first I thought “Man, this guy is insane, Java is the future, this programming language is not even popular”, but I was wrong, I live in Brazil and that time (January 2010) Ruby wasn’t a known programming language here, but after some research I realized it was popular in other countries like the USA, then I’ve decided to take a look at it.

The First Book

I remember the first book I got for learning Ruby, it was Programming Ruby by The Pragmatic Programmer’s Guide  , at first I was amazed by the way the book was organized, they used a non convencional way of teaching a new programming language, which sounded pretty amazing.

After I finished that book I decided to read “The Agile Development with Rails ” also from The Pragmatic Programmer’s Guide, and once again, another cool way of teaching a framework, it was like, reading some basic stuff and then jump into a real application.

The First Job

After studying lots of things about Ruby/Rails I realized I needed a job, but then I thought: How to get a job in a country where Ruby is not even known ? Lucky, I met a guy that was working for a company which I don’t remember the name right now, but he was using Rails and that fitted perfectly for me, so I asked him for an opportunity to work with him, and surprisingly he said yes.

We started working from his garage (I know this sounds like a cliche, but it was like that), the first projected I did was a simple web site with a couple of pages like: Contact, Bio, Fotos. I was really excited when I finished it, you know, the feeling you have when you get something done.

After a couple of months working with him, I realized I learnt how to program faster as I’d be if I’d studied Java. I’m not saying here Java is a bad language, but in that time I was a beginner and making a lot of things with less code and a more descriptive programming language sounded like a dream to me.

 

Nowadays

I’m still using Ruby on Rails on some projects, but not as much as before, but why ? Because now I’m working as a mobile developer and there are many things a I need to deal when making apps, one of them is: Scalability. Ruby is not scalable which is pretty bad for today’s applications. You may wondering, but there are a lot of solutions for that with Rails, I know, the fact is: I need something made for it, this is how I met Elixir , but this is a subject for another Post (which I promise I will do it soon).

 

Advices

If you’re new to the programming world, you should learn Ruby. Why ? Because it is still popular, and you can understand how the programming world works faster. There are still a lot of jobs for Ruby developers, of course, with a lot of skills needed, but still worth it.

Acknowledgment

Thanks for reading this post, it is always a pleasure writing for you guys. If you like what you just read and somehow you want to support me, you can become a Patreon . Being my Patreon makes you get my private posts about programming with iOS and Ruby.

If you’d like to know more about me or what I do, you can follow me on Instagram or Twitter .

See you next time!

Swift: How to check if your app is running on a Device or a Simulator ?

Sometimes you need to check if the app is running on a device or a simulator. Why? If you’re using GoogleMobileAds lib you may need to verify is you’re on simulator to show the testing ads provided by Google.

Bildschirmfoto 2017-09-22 um 15.48.38

Happily there’s a way to do it. I personally prefer creating a struct, since I don’t need a class for it.

So let’s get started:

struct Platform {

    static let isSimulator: Bool = {

        var isSim = false

        #if arch(i386) || arch(x86_64)

          isSim = true

        #endif

        return isSim

    }()

}

 

What does the code do ? It basically checks if the architecture is i386 or x86_64 which means a computer.(Simulator)

The arch(i386) build configuration returns true when code is compiled for the 32–bit iOS simulator.

Then you can use it on your code:

   if(Platform.isSimulator){

    //your code goes here

  }

Acknowledgment

Thanks for reading this post, it is always a pleasure writing for you guys. If you like what you just read and somehow you want to support me, you can become a Patreon . Being my Patreon makes you get my private posts about programming with iOS and Ruby.

If you’d like to know more about me or what I do, you can follow me on Instagram or Twitter .

See you next time!